Scientific Program

Conference Series LLC Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 7th International Conference on Addictive Disorders, Addiction Medicine and Pharmaceuticals San Diego, California, USA.

Day 1 :

Keynote Forum

Elia Gourgouris PhD

The Happiness Center, USA

Keynote: Intentional happiness: 7 paths to lasting happiness

Time : 08:50-09:35

Addiction Therapy 2018 International Conference Keynote Speaker Elia Gourgouris PhD photo
Biography:

Elia Gourgouris PhD is an international Keynote Speaker, Executive Coach, and a Leadership Consultant. He is the author of the #1 Amazon Best-Selling book, 7 Paths to Lasting Happiness. He has also published over 120 articles for various newspapers and magazines, including the Huffington Post. Dr Elia is the president of
The Happiness Center– an organization dedicated to creating personal success and happiness. Over the last 25-plus years, he has been a passionate promoter of Happiness and Wellness both on an individual and on the Corporate level! His workshops, courses, books, and Coaching have helped thousands of people achieve happiness and fulfillment, both in their careers and in their personal lives. He received his BA in Psychology from UCLA and his MA and PhD in Clinical Psychology from the California Graduate Institute.

Abstract:

What is Happiness? Aristotle answered this by saying "Happiness is the meaning and purpose of life, the whole aim, and end of human existence" Happiness is a choice! It is also attractive, healthy, and being connected, but it takes effort. What inhibits our happiness? Several factors have a direct impact on our level of life satisfaction and fulfillment, including fear (of change, fear of success, and fear of failure), comparisons, selfishness, the burden of perfectionism, lack of forgiveness (and self-forgiveness), our inner critic, and toxic relationships. When these mental and emotional roadblocks are removed, our inner joy will be freed from constraints and returned to our awareness. The 7 Paths to Lasting Happiness reviews several of these roadblocks and provides both principles and “take action exercises” for individuals to learn from, and through its application to ultimately achieve genuine happiness, including:

1st Path: Loving Yourself a) Personal Brand b) Perfectionism c) Inner Critic d) Comparisons

2nd Path: Gratitude a) Attitude of Gratitude b) University of Adversity

3rd Path: Forgiveness a) Forgiveness equals freedom b) Self-forgiveness is the key

4th Path: Follow Your Passion a) Getting out of your comfort zone brings growth

5th Path: Nourish Your Spirit a) Faith vs Fear b) Meditation & Purpose

6th Path: Loving relationships a) Love languages b) Criticisms & Toxic relationships c) Authentic listening d) Trust

7th Path: Service a) The antidote to selfishness

Thousands of individuals have taken this life satisfaction survey, and various graduate students throughout the world, (including Singapore, UK, and The Philippines and others) have used it as part of their graduate thesis. It is intended as a tool for

 

Keynote Forum

Quinn L Johnson

University of Missouri, USA

Keynote: Enhanced recovery after surgery: Methods to decrease opioid use postoperatively

Time : 09:35-10:20

Addiction Therapy 2018 International Conference Keynote Speaker Quinn L Johnson photo
Biography:

Quinn L Johnson has a specific interest in outpatient, regional and orthopedic anesthesiology. As Chair of the Department of Anesthesiology at the University of Missouri. He works closely in the education and training of both medical students and residents in anesthesiology. He has lectured and published on a variety of anesthesia topics including regional anesthesia, sedation guidelines, airway evaluation, and the post-op pain management for patients using chronic opioids. He is active in the American Society of Anesthesiology and currently serves as President of the Missouri Society of Anesthesiology. Current research projects include post-operative delirium in the geriatric patient and implementation of the enhanced recovery after surgery in multiple specialties at the University of Missouri.

 

Abstract:

Statement of the Problem: Patients nationwide are becoming aware of the dangers of opioid medications. Those patients facing surgery are increasingly concerned about how to best manage post-operative pain while minimizing the risk of opioid addiction. Anesthesiologists at a variety of centers have developed new anesthetic approaches to deal with these concerns. The approach has yielded two significant benefits: firstly, a decrease in the overall amount of narcotics needed during and after surgery and secondly it’s a decrease in the overall length of stay in the hospital for surgical patients admitted to the hospital postoperatively. This innovative approach has been implemented at several medical centers including at the University of Missouri with great success and has led to improvements in surgical outcomes, pain control and reduced length of stay. Keys to the success include pre-operative patient education and expectations, use of multi-modal pain management techniques, careful fluid management intra-operatively, and early postoperative ambulation. Communication between nursing, anesthesia and surgery teams is essential in successfully implementing an enhanced recovery after surgery program. The need to shift from current and established patterns of care require that all providers are educated and agree to treat patients in a new and different paradigm in dealing with surgical pain. The use of enhanced recovery techniques have initially been limited to a few surgical types and are now spreading rapidly to all areas of surgery. The lessons learned in the operating room will likely spread to other medical specialties and a transformation in the treatment of pain is needed to reduce the dependence mainly on opioids by health care providers.

 

Keynote Forum

James Giordano

Georgetown University Medical Center, USA

Keynote: Chronic pain and substance use disorders: Neuroethical issues and directions in assessment and care

Time : 10:50-11:35

Addiction Therapy 2018 International Conference Keynote Speaker James Giordano photo
Biography:

James Giordano PhD is Professor in the Departments of Neurology and Biochemistry, and Chief of the Neuroethics Studies Program of Georgetown University Medical Center, Washington, DC, USA; and is a Senior Research Fellow of the European Union Human Brain Project. His ongoing work focuses upon mechanisms, diagnosis and treatment of neuropsychiatric spectrum disorders, and neuroethics-legal issues fostered by the use of emerging neurotechnologies in research and clinical care. The author of over 275 publications, his recent books include Pain: Mind, Meaning and Medicine; and Neurotechnology: Premises, Potential, and Problems. In recognition of his achievements, he was elected to the European Academy of Science and Arts, the Dana Alliance of Brain Initiatives, and the Royal Society of Medicine.

 

Abstract:

The DSM-5 is frequently used, either alone or in combination with the ICD, to categorize psychiatric disorders, and in so doing, establish better criteria from which to plan and execute clinical care. Clarifying diagnostic terms is vital to standardize what they signify, and this may be even more important when considering the dual-diagnoses and the care comorbidity may require. In this lecture, I will address practical ethical-legal issues and concerns generated by a dual diagnosis of chronic pain and substance-use/addictive disorder. Specifically, I will describe how diagnostic labels – and particularly those related to mental illness- can be stigmatizing, and may evoke medical, legal and social biases that affect the ways that patients are regarded and treated. I will explicate the complexities of these disorders apropos the current opioid crisis and argue that diagnosis demands action. I will posit that the philosophy of medicine defines a moral obligation to develop improved assessment and care of those who are burdened by both chronic pain and substance use/addictive disorders. Toward these ends, I will propose ways that newly developing neurotechnologies, such as types of genetic assays, neuroimaging, novel pharmaceutical preparations, and non-invasive and deep brain stimulation could – and should – be engaged to improve the focus, scope, safety, effectiveness – and efficiency – of care. As well, I will describe how the realization of any such effort will require the conjoint participation of economic and administrative infrastructures of medicine, as well as the development of supportive guidelines, policies, and law(s).

 

Keynote Forum

Bob Reese

Jefferson College of Health Sciences, USA

Keynote: The 13th step: Thriving in recovery

Time : 11:35-12:20

Addiction Therapy 2018 International Conference Keynote Speaker Bob Reese photo
Biography:

Bob Reese PhD is a Professor of Psychology at Jefferson College of Health Sciences in Roanoke, VA. Bob's research interests are all framed in Positive Psychology with a focus on Magis Thinking for enhanced performance and well-being – this focus has roots in his 25 years in the NFL. He is currently engaged in research projects on the recovery processes from addiction at Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute (VTCRI). As part of Dr. Warren Bickel’s Addiction Recovery Research Center (ARRC) research team, he was instrumental in helping to create and launch the International Quit & Recovery Registry (IQRR), a novel approach that employs crowd-sourcing technology to establish, maintain, and grow an unprecedented database on the process of recovery. Bob is the author of The 13th Step: Thriving in Recovery (AuthorHouse, 2017).

 

Abstract:

While addiction itself has been widely studied, the process of recovery from addiction has received little attention from the science of psychology. Because recovery from addiction is a chronic process, it becomes essential to understand the process of recovery and the characteristics of individuals who are successful in recovery maintenance. To help bridge this gap in knowledge, the International Quit & Recovery Registry (IQRR) was developed in 2011 and recruits participants in all phases of addiction recovery. Currently, the IQRR has thousands of registrants from more than 42 countries. After becoming website members, registrants have access to online monthly psychometric assessments. Along with demographics, each assessment asks about recent relapse and includes measures and tasks aimed at understanding the characteristics of people in recovery. Thriving in recovery is informed by examining by three positive psychology assessments included in the IQRR psychometric battery: The Subjective Happiness Scale (SHS), the Satisfaction with Life Scale (SWLS), and the Grit Scale (GRIT), which is a measure of perseverance and commitment to long-term goals. These current results are discussed along with positive psychology interventions that enhance these attributes. Additionally, neuroscientific research provides evidence that addiction is a disease of the brain; that relapse is part of the recovery process; and that a brain in recovery can heal and grow positively due to neuroplasticity. This video presentation provides fundamental information regarding neuroscience in the process of recovery and a method of developing self-directed neuroplasticity.

 

  • Exhibitor Session
Location: Kensington 2

Session Introduction

Theodore Bender

Addiction Campus, USA Panel Discussion

Title: The opioid overdose epidemic: Current trends, treatment, and hope for the future

Time : 12:20-12:45

Speaker
Biography:

Theodore Bender is a clinical psychologist with expertise in the area of suicidality and addictive disorders. He is currently the Chief Executive Officer of Turning Point treatment center in Southaven Mississippi which focuses on dual diagnosis clients presenting with severe substance use disorders. He was a member of the Military Suicide Research Consortium for 4 years as a Post- Doc before devoting himself full-time in treating addiction and its related comorbidities. His main focus is to bring community resources together to fight the opioid epidemic on all fronts. He believes that if local and national entities come together as a unified front, the opioid epidemic can be defeated saving hundreds of thousands of lives and bringing families together again.

 

Abstract:

Statement of the Problem: Drug overdose deaths have reached epic proportions. The Center for Disease Control just released the 2017 epidemiological data showing over 72,000 drug overdose deaths in the United States. This represents nearly a 10% increase in drug overdose deaths over the previous year of 2016 which saw 64,000 overdose deaths. Significant increases in the death rates have been tied to the synthetic opioids, most notably, Fentanyl. While heroin overdoses are seemingly remaining flat, synthetic opioids such as Fentanyl continue to cause significant fatalities nationwide. In 2016, fentanyl and other synthetic opioids overtook prescription opioids regarding involvement in overdose deaths. With over 2 million Americans suffering from opioid dependence, the need for treatment availability and increased resources is vital. Fentanyl is a highly concentrated synthetic that is being used on the street to cut other drugs. For example, it is commonly being used to cut other drugs such as heroin, cocaine, methamphetamine, and benzodiazepines. Often times people will buy drugs off the street expecting to get Percocet or Vicodin, not realizing that they are really purchasing a much more powerful drug that is 50 to 100 times more powerful. Carfentanil, another variation of the synthetics, is another drug that is hitting the street and is 10,000 times more powerful than morphine. This drug was originally created to be an elephant tranquilizer. It is also now being used as a powerful cutting agent for heroin, contributing even further to the drastic rise in overdose deaths. Hope for the future is on the horizon. Despite the CDC data from 2017, there is some evidence to suggest that the death rate started to level off at the end of 2017. Better access to treatment, changes to prescription regulations, and additional government funding may be helping to reduce the problem. Future treatment methods will be discussed.

 

  • Plenary Talk
Location: Kensington 2

Session Introduction

Christy Wise

Life Sauce.Org, USA

Title: Mass incarceration: Psychological issues impacting men, women, and children

Time : 13:45-14:45

Speaker
Biography:

Christy Wise is a most noted for her work as an Expert in the Field of Clinical Psychology, Dr Wise had built an impeccable reputation as a past Certified Child Custody Evaluator with high conflict family’s, Certified Mediator, Forensic Evaluations and Court Ordered Reunification Therapy. Today Dr Wise is most known for her work as a high impact Keynote Speaker & Intensive Goal Directed Coach and Educator. With her rich professional and personal experiences, she has committed herself to help her clients and audiences transform small moments into radical results. She passionately reveals how the unraveling of human dignity, truly can be followed by an unexpected emergence of resilience and rebirth of the human spirit.

 

Abstract:

Statement of the problem: The United States incarcerates more people than any other country. Many factors contribute to this phenomenon, including a criminal justice system with ongoing race-based injustices, a strong and unchecked prosecutorial system, a failure to rehabilitate those previously incarcerated, unidentified and untreated mental health issues. Underlying it all – there’s a growing lack of empathy in this country. One way to build empathy is to experience something you may never have experienced – and don’t ever intend to engage. Awareness through empathic thought can open minds to the horrors of imprisonment that can, over time, lead to prison reform. Exploring reform issues, as expressed through different artistic lenses, is a psychological field trip into the criminal justice system’s emotional/social impact on men, women, and families. Incarceration inoculates inmates, and their families, with feelings of fear, eroded dignity, humiliation, emotional darkness.

Methodology & Theoretical Orientation: Using the Arts in different media such as poetry, plays, literature, paintings, and the film becomes the vehicle for experiencing something never experience, through alternative means.

Representative works include: Oscar Wilde - The Ballad of Reading Gaol (Poem, 1896, Tennessee Williams -Not About Nightingales (Play,1938), Sister Helen Prejean, Dead Man Walking (Book/Film, 1995), Salvador Dali - Melting clocks, The Persistence of Memory (Painting, 1931), and Franz Kafka, The Trial (Novel, 1925).

Findings: Current research on the experience of understanding another person's thoughts, feelings, and condition from their point of view, rather than from your own will be reviewed. Where a more empathic approach within the criminal justice system, inmate incarceration system, and reentry system can affect important social change will be explored.

Conclusion & Significance: Social change can only come about when people can empathize with the others. Empathy facilitates prosocial behaviors that come from within, rather than being forced, so that we behave in a more compassionate manner with those caught in the jaws of the criminal justice system in the United States.

 

  • Psychology | Pain Management |Opiate Abuse and Addiction | Psychiatric Disorders or Psychological Syndromes | Industrial and Organizational Psychology | Opiate Epidemic / Opioid Crisis
Location: Kensington 2
Speaker

Chair

Carol Rose Adkisson

The Trauma and Healing Foundation, USA

Speaker

Co-Chair

Bindu Babu

Quantum University, USA

Session Introduction

Carol Rose Adkisson

The Trauma and Healing Foundation, USA

Title: The secret world of hoarders

Time : 14:45-15:10

Speaker
Biography:

Carol Rose Adkisson is an author, speaker, a teacher and a Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist and The Transformational Coach. Carol Adkisson is the owner of a private practice and founder/Chief Executive officer of a group non-profit, The Trauma and Healing Foundation in Fontana. She also is an author of several books including Recovering My Life, a Personal Bariatric Story. She co-developed and participates in a podcast entitled Curious Intentions. She specializes in anxiety, depression, trauma, couples’ therapy, ADHD, substance issues, immigration psychological evaluations, weight loss and bariatric surgery and 12 step recovery and of course HOARDING. She is trained in various treatments including EMDR and Trauma-Focused CBT and numerous other modalities. She also has 34 years of experience working with recovery-based programs. She serves individuals, couples, families, children, and adolescents. She utilizes "discernment theory" to perceive which treatment is most helpful for the individual client's needs. Her group practice employs therapists with many different specialties. She supervises this practice and is the Clinical Director. She has her bachelor’s Degree and master’s Degree in Marriage Family Therapy from Hope International University. Her hobbies include volleyball, spending time with her family and she is a foodie, always ready to try something new.

 

Abstract:

Stepping into a Hoarders World is not as easy as you may think. A Hoarder has multiple layers that if peeled back, may possibly reveal a Family System that helps to enable their behaviors, traumatic events from their childhood, anxiety, obsessive-compulsive thinking and possibly an addictive personality that is compounded by delusional thinking. Would you like a peek into that world? Let’s help these clients that are more common than you may realize. Let us delve into that world and explore the depths of their secret world. This training will encompass many objectives that are important to understanding the hoarders that may cross your path. As a child of a hoarder, I grew up hoping to understand the underpinnings of my mother. Why were objects so important to her? As my sisters and I grew up and moved on, her hoarding increased, as it often does when there is no one to help stop the hoarding behaviors. She was diagnosed with cancer and thus we as a family helped her to the next stage of her life. Letting go of her things and moving her to an assisted living facility. We took her things away, either discarded, donated and/or sold them. Neither the family or she had no choice at that point. Because of this, I grew up with a heart to help this population to heal. This training will create a picture of the average hoarder and their family system. It’s important to understand the system to help the hoarder heal. It’s also necessary for the family to form an alliance, just as you would with an addict or an alcoholic. We will discuss the five stages of hoarding. The diagnostic criteria as presented in the DSM-5 and various treatment methods to deal with this insidious problem. Many times, as clinicians you are unaware that your clients present with this problem. This is generally a secret condition, they are not hoarders, instead, they are collectors, at least in their mind, however delusional it may be. Let me help you to lead your clients to success and freedom.

Goals/Objectives: To understand the average hoarder and their family system. Current research on brain studies and the circular thought process of the hoarder. To name the five Stages of Hoarding and how they manifest. Describing DSM-5 Diagnostic Criteria and its similarity to the addiction process. Treatment Methods for the hoarder and their dysfunctional family system.

 

Speaker
Biography:

Statement of the Problem: The misuse of opioids is resulting in unprecedented death and hardship. Through the CMS-funded Transforming Clinical Practice Initiative, Vizient worked with over 26,000 clinicians to become part of the solution to this epidemic. The purpose of this study is to review best practice to avoid addiction to prescribed opioid medications.

Methodology and Theoretical Orientation: These recommendations were based on observational input from members across the country from their perspective on best practice.

Findings: Using three quick changes in behavior and in standardized sets can have a major impact on reducing risk factors that commonly result in prescribed opioid addiction.

Conclusion & Significance: This project showed that clinicians can make a significant impact in reducing prescriptions of oral opioids by the implementing the following steps: (i) Do not prescribe greater than 3-5 days of medication for non-metastatic pain. Studies tell us that most patients are at a higher risk for opioid addition if given greater than 7 days of medication. (ii) Remove all narcotics from standardized order sets. (iii) Implement shared decision making into your daily care of patients. Discuss the potential risks and benefits of opioids versus other analgesic options with patients.

 

Abstract:

Tomas Villanueva, DO, is the clinical and operational lead for the Vizient TCPI team and the Vizient PTN. The network has more than 26,000 enrolled clinicians in the CMS-funded TCPI program to prepare for the move to value-based reimbursement. Villanueva previously served as chief of primary care for the Baptist Health Medical Group, part of Baptist Health South Florida. He was responsible for primary care redesign, transforming these practices toward value-based payments, risk sharing, and population health. He has more than 17 years of physician leadership experience, first as a hospitalist, where he created multiple different programs. He also served as corporate medical director of employee health and chief of palliative care for Baptist Health.

 

Speaker
Biography:

Ingrid E Blair lives in Hudson, WI with her husband, Tom, and their sons, Jake & Cooper. She is Vice President, Business & Marketing, 3M Drug Delivery Systems Division, a current advisory board member with Rise Together (weallrisetogether.com), a former board member of the Hamline University School of Business, and of Solumed, a medical supplies company. Ingrid has a bachelor’s degree in Chemical Engineering from the University of Minnesota. She is a casual runner, a recent yoga convert, and an avid downhill skier. Ingrid is presently on leave from her position at 3M to honor and mourn the loss of her son and support her husband and living children.

 

Abstract:

Statement of the Problem: The social stigma associated with opioid addiction is limiting the public engagement to drive government institutions to swiftly, fully and effectively address this epidemic. Embedded in the stigma is the belief of middle-class families that opioid addiction only happens to ‘bad kids’ with ‘bad parents’ which inherently limits their active participation in pushing for funding for public intervention. This presentation is a mother’s story of how the disease of addiction impacted her family and what we as individuals can do to break the stigma and take steps to change the trajectory of this epidemic. We called him our beautiful boy because he was that; strikingly handsome, charismatic, wicked smart with a dry sense of humor and appealing laugh. Our son, Hunter, died on December 4, 2016, at the age of 24 from a heroin overdose.

 

Norris Wise

The Chicago School of Professional Psychology, USA

Title: Listening and its impact on productivity in the workplace

Time : 16:20-16:45

Speaker
Biography:

Norris Wise is an adjunct professor of Human Resource Management at Park University – Camp Pendleton Campus, CA. He is a 21 year Marine veteran, who formerly served as Special Staff Directorate and advised as the subject-matter expert on equal opportunity and diversity management across the largest operational force in the U.S. Marine Corps. He earned a B.A. in Communication Studies, MSA in Human Resources Administration and is currently a doctoral student in the Business Psychology program (Organizational Leadership) at The Chicago School of Professional Psychology. He is a member of the Academy of Management and the National Communication Association.

 

Abstract:

Communication is a process of transmitting information from a designated source to a receiver, and providing feedback to the understanding of that transaction. In human communication, listening is a substantial part of this communicative act. Definitions of the term (listening) are noted by various scholars but most are germane to cognition; listening as a behavior has been overlooked. Poor listening skills hinder productivity in organizations; thus, this study focuses on listening and its impact (behavior) on productivity, which is relative to performance. Flynn, Valikoski & Grau (2008), posited for over five decades that business experts believed that productive listening ranks high on the list of priorities in the workplace. The purpose of this research was to determine what impact listening has on productivity in the workplace. Three specific objectives included: (1) to determine the impact listening skills have on productivity in the workplace, (2) to identify factors that influence listening skills and its impact on productivity in the workplace, and (3) to provide recommendations to improve listening skills to improve productivity in the workplace. A survey was used to solicit responses from participants from two nonprofit organizations, which provided quantitative and qualitative data. The results revealed that listening has a significant impact on productivity, listening skills training was identified as increasing productivity and that listening skills training should be implemented in the workplace.

 

Karina Blancarte Figueroa

International University of Professional Studies, Mexico

Title: Women’s psychology: Breaking stereotypes in understanding female’s psychology in the 21st century

Time : 16:45-17:10

Speaker
Biography:

Karina Blancarte Figueroa has completed her MA in Holistic Psychology and is currently a PhD candidate from The International University of Professional Studies. She is the owner of The Holistic Center, which provides psychotherapy, Reiki Treatments, and Yoga Classes. Her extensive yoga, meditation, and scientific research have taken her to the Amazonian jungle to test and explore the ancient traditions, environmental healing medicine's impact and to The Himalayas to learn the ancient yoga practices reviving wisdom of yogis. She has delved into science to decode the power of inner energy and mastered personal and social transformation, successfully taking people from suffering to loving, appreciating and unleashing the potential in life.

 

Abstract:

According to The Mayo Clinic, Pre-Menstrual Dysphoric Disorder (PMDD) is a severe, sometimes disabling extension of premenstrual syndrome (PMS). Although regular PMS and PMDD both have physical and emotional symptoms, PMDD causes extreme mood shifts that can disrupt your work and damage your relationships. PMDD is considered a mental disorder according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disease (DSM-5), however, the causes of PMS and PMDD have not been found. As a matter of fact, Premenstrual syndrome (PMS) is a medical condition that affects some women of childbearing age. More than one in three women suffer from PMS. One in 20 suffers so severely that their lives are seriously affected. The lack of understanding and information about what women’s cycle is, is affecting thousands of women causing frustration, discrimination, and self-judgment creating an inner and outer lack of balance that most of the times end up in severe depression affecting women physically, emotionally and mentally. With the speed we live on a daily basis there’s been acceleration on the levels of depression and anxiety and other mood disorders. Many of them have turned to medication for relief. The use of anti-depressants has increased nearly 400% since 1990. The program is designed to cover: A shift in the perception of what women’s cycle is. Understanding the energetic (Energy Psychology) point of view of women’s cycle providing information about the advantages of it, breaking with stigmatized patterns as well as hints to use it as a tool for a balanced and mindful lifestyle.

 

Mireille Ndje Ndje

University of Yaounde I, Cameroon

Title: Psychic itinerary of the cesarean section in six Cameroonian primiparous

Time : 17:10-17:35

Speaker
Biography:

Mireille Ndje Ndje is a Senior Lecturer at the University of Yaounde I in the Department of Psychology. Researcher and practitioner, she is also President of Association pour le Développement et la Promotion de la Psychologie en Afrique (ADPPA), General Secretary of the Association des Psychologues Clinicians du Cameroun and a member of the Réseaux Mondial de Pratique Clinique of the WHO. She is interested in Clinical and pathological Psychology, psychotraumatology, research ethics, the qualitative method. She holds a PhD in Clinical Psychology and Psychopathology.

 

Abstract:

Statement of the Problem: The birth of a child does not create a split with the pregnancy and desires of the conception of the parents but rather confirms the continuity of the fantasies, the representations which animate these and more still the mother since the desire of the child. These fantasies and daydreams inherent in pregnancy and described by Bydlowsky are relegated to the background, and sometimes even ignored by families, but especially by obstetric care professionals during birth.

Methodology: This article is an intrusion using semi-directive interviews in the psychic dynamics of six Cameroonian primiparous women who gave birth by cesarean section in a specialized hospital, from the preoperative to the postoperative through the operative.

Findings: It emerges from this study that when the normal process of birth is changed, the mother can undergo this event considered natural in her cultural universe. Cesarean section is certainly a birth, but it is anti-physiological, because of the lack of passage that leads to a feeling of foreignness in women. In the Caesarean section, there seems to be a lack of narcissistic investment in the reproductive apparatus. Caesarized parturients feel guilty for not having given life according to the accepted model, both on the religious, social, cultural and psychic level. They feel guilty for not being able to repeat the act that women have been doing in their environment since the beginning of time. For their own family they bring denigration, for the in-laws they are incapable, for the other parturients they are inferior, and for themselves they are guilty.

Conclusion: This birth-related surgery does not give women a leeway to become involved in the process. The physical undergoes invasive gestures that are not felt in a present but are imagined with a shift of time, of reality and resonance on the psyche.

 

Nourah Abdul Kader

All Smiles Dental, India

Title: Opioids in Dentistry

Time : 17:35-18:00

Speaker
Biography:

Nourah Abdul Kader has completed her degree in Bachelor of Dental Surgery at the age of 23 years from The Tamil Nadu Dr MGR Medical University, Chennai, India. She has also completed a Basic Implantology course. She is a triple gold medalist, holding a GPA of 4.0 and has received the Best Academic Performer Award during the academic period 2012-17. She has presented papers and posters in various National and International conferences for which she has won laurels. She has presented a paper on “The considerations for the administration of General Anesthesia in Children” in the 3rd Annual Meeting on Pediatrics and Geriatric dentistry in New York, USA.

 

Abstract:

The prescription of opioids in dentistry is a relevant and current issue given that this class of drugs is still widely used in the treatment of pain, and dentists play a major role in knowing how to properly prescribe them. The opioids most commonly used in today’s practice are codeine and oxycodone, they can both be prescribed to manage acute pain when all else fails, and they should be administered in association with paracetamol. The prescription of these drugs is made only when the benefits outweigh the risks and whenever strong analgesia is procured. In children, the use of codeine is compared to morphine and, according to the guidelines, the use of morphine should be considered instead, but in Portugal codeine is still prescribed. In the elderly and during pregnancy, use of opioids should be avoided and needs dose adjustments. This paper focuses on the theme that the pharmacotherapy of opioids in the practice of dentistry is common, breaking the prejudice that can arise from the prescription of this class of drugs.